• Journaling

    Trying to Be Thankful During the End of the World

    Thursday, November 26th, marks some special holidays for Americans. There’s National Cake Day, which is where we sing that one DNCE song. There’s National Day of Mourning, which is kind of a big deal if you or a loved one have ever lived with or been a Native. And then there’s FUCK YEAH THANKSGIVING [ELECTRIC GUITAR WAILS] [FIREWORKS] [DEAD TURKEY SOUNDS]. And that’s the one I’m going to talk about today, because I’m not well and I need help but I also have to keep things together for my children. Many of my social media followers aren’t American, and of those some of you aren’t Canadian (who have your own…

  • Reviews

    Review – Crimson Sands: Sosaku Online (Book 1)

    If you’re looking for a book with big breasted lamias and paragraphs of discussion on hairy dwarf feet, this book will disappoint in every way. If you’re looking for a solid adventure in the LitRPG subgenre that features a likeable character who is smart enough not to hate but not so smart the system doesn’t pose a challenge, this is an easy book to sell you. Consider purchasing this book from the above banner, or this link. The website may receive a commission if you do! As a subgenre, LitRPG kind of struggles a bit with where it’s footing is. Do readers want to see so few stats that they…

  • Reviews

    Review – Janus and Oblivion (The Nightmares of Alamir, #1)

    Sometimes you read a story about a very typical do-gooder hero who sets out to altruistically make the world a better place because that’s just the sort of person he is. Janus and Oblivion is not that sort of story. The titular Janus is, for lack of a better words, a self-serving narcissistic asshole. And these qualities work well for this story, because not only does he get his come-uppance, he also comes up on top. It’s a well crafted, beautiful thing. The fact that it uses LitRPG tropes to get to where it is going makes the story that much sweeter. Consider purchasing this book from the banner above,…

  • Non-Fiction

    Point Three Percent

    I played Genshin Impact for about a week. I didn’t hate it, but I could tell I was going to have to put more effort and more money into it if I were going to continue to enjoy it. It made sense, then, to step away on a good note. While I still could. This is not a review of Genshin Impact, the most popular “gacha” game of all time. There are plenty of people who have sank more time into the game to tell you if the game will fit your needs and interests if you’re so inclined. It is, however, a reflection of my time with other titles…

  • Reviews

    Review – The Pyre Starter

    The Pyre Starter is a book I picked up and put down many times over the course of the month I started it, and I struggled to understand why. It was this journey I wanted to see the end of, but every time I picked it up I found myself reading a chapter or two and then… putting it down. It wasn’t until I got about halfway through the book that I started picking up steam. As I finished it, I understood why. The Pyre Starter is an excellent book. But while what drew me to it was the adventure and mystery of the magical talismans that served to propel…

  • Reviews

    Review – Monster Girl in My Closet

    “Because eating bats hasn’t caused enough problems in 2020, let’s have sex with them!” – Me as I preordered this book, September 2020 I kid, mostly. Jamie Hawke is no stranger to non-human girls as love interests or as part of a harem, and in many ways his newest release Monster Girl in My Closet feels like a natural step in the right direction for him. It’s a rather fitting book given the Halloween season and one I can readily recommend to anyone who is into the idea of reading a story about a harem of women who are, by our world’s sake anyways, monstrous. The author definitely caters to…

  • Reviews

    Review – 21 Days with Momo

    Koji Kojou is a mysterious man. As an author, he strives to write slice-of-life stories that are influenced by Japanese web novels yet manage to be distinctly western, perhaps even Midwestern. They tend to be short, sweet, and show characters willing to reflect upon themselves and grow from their pasts. Which is interesting when compared to the man himself. “Koji” is not this author’s real name. I know because he mailed me something. I did my research, asked around, and I’m not gonna lie, I’m pretty concerned. Apparently, by day he’s an accountant, but he’s been moonlight by night as an assassin. CRAZY I KNOW. Apparently, he works as an…

  • Anime,  Reviews

    Review – Cross Ange: Rondo of Angel And Dragon

    There’s a dated joke in poor taste by internet cartoonist Natalie Dee. On a blog post she states her intent to swap out a problematic epithet with a replacement: I am going to be replacing “retarded” with “rondo” from now on. I think that the word retarded is played out, and there is nothing more retarded than a Kia Rondo, so it seems to lend itself quite nicely. I know that Rondo in the sense of this anime’s title is actually a reference to music, but the term isn’t used properly there either, so forget it, let’s go for broke. I’m not sure why I decided to watch Cross Ange.…

  • Uncategorized

    Review – Escape to Candyland

    Some Instagram user once said “It’s always darkest before the dawn.” They were an idiot – the lights always go out for good eventually – but they always get lots of hearts on their statement, while reality gets no likes at all. A lot of us aren’t privileged enough to buy into fancy ideas of “some day.” We still find hope though, something to hold onto. That appears to be a running theme in the group of intertwined short stories and vignettes that are Yong Takahashi’s The Escape to Candyland. All of these stories tie in to Atlanta, Georgia in one way or another, with interspersed references and reoccurring background…

  • Reviews

    Review – Colony One

    Ever read a sci-fi book so good it makes you feel like it’s going to negatively impact the reviews you give for future books you read, or that you need to go back and lower past reviews you’ve written because other books simply can’t compare? Colony One, by author T. L. Ford, was that book for me. Despite it’s frankly unusual and forgettable cover with it’s strange lettering choice and come-hither blond woman on the front imposed over a picture of the earth, it’s actually a gritty tale of a woman who builds a company from scratch that ends up being a space station, backed by several crime organizations. Consider…